Tiffany’s 2Q12: interesting stock market reaction

the report

Prior to the New York open on August 27th, TIF announced its 2Q12 (ended July 31st) results.  Earnings were up by 2%, year on year, at $92 million.  Eps were $.72/share, also up 2% yoy.  Ex non-recurring items, which depressed 2Q11 eps by $.16, the yoy earnings comparison was negative–down 17%.

Quarterly sales came in at $887 million, also a 2% yoy advance.   Negative currency effects–a 2% decline of Asia-Pacific currencies against the dollar, and a 9% fall of European, reduced that figure from what would have been a 3% constant currency gain.

EPS were a penny below the Wall Street consensus of $.73.

Although TIF said its 2Q12 performance met its expectations, it lowered full-year guidance for the seond time in two quarters.  The new full-year eps range is $3.55-$3.70 vs. guidance of $3.70-$3.80 announced with 1Q12 results.

The stock?  It rose by 7%+ on this news.

the details

the Americas 

Same store sales were down 5% yoy, and minus 9% in the flagship store in NYC.  All the weakness came from domestic customers.  Sales to foreign tourists were flat, with a falloff in EU buying offset by increases in Asian visitor purchases.

Florida, Texas, and Guam were notable areas of strength.

Asia-Pacific

Same store sales were down by 7%, two of those percentage points due to currency weakness.  Slight price increases, lower unit volume.

Japan

12% same store sales growth in local currency, offset somewhat by 2% yen weakness vs. the US dollar.  Continuing recovery from Fukushima-related weakness.

Europe

2% same store sales growth was more than erased by 9% currency weakness.  Continental Europe was stronger than the UK.  Foreign tourist buying made the figures look better than they would have been from local customers alone.

the balance sheet

It’s not something I’ve commented on before.  But the yoy change is remarkable.

During 2Q12, TIF raised $250 million in long-term debt, $60 million of which went to retire maturing borrowings.

Total debt now stands at $940 million, cash at $367 million.  A year ago, the figures were $694 million and $565 million.  Put another way, the company has gone from net debt of $129 million to net debt of $573 million, a $444 million negative swing, over the past twelve months.

The figure means TIF invested close to half a billion dollars in excess of funds generated by operations in business expansion.  Most seems to me to have been used to build inventories, with a modest amount for expanding the store network.

market reaction has been positive…

…even though there’s evidence of a continuing slowdown in high-end jewelry buying in both the US and China.  Nevetheless, TIF shares appear to have bottomed around $50 in June.  They’ve been rising steadily–and outperforming the overall market–since.

my take

TIF shares are up over 20% during July and August, despite the weak business outlook.  I hadn’t expected this.  I’d thought the stock would likely languish until there were clear signs of a pickup among either Asian or US customers.

Yes, the company is very well-managed.  The newly raised debt gives it a larger cash cushion, in case its business remains in the doldrums for an extended period.  It seems clear to me that TIF has, prudently, shifted out of rapid expansion mode and into a more defensive cash generation stance.  If this turns out to be the last downward earnings revision, the stock was inexpensive at $50.

Still, I think it’s interesting that the market is willing to pay for an anticipated recovery in TIF’s business so far in advance.  It conveys to me the suggestion of an underlying bullishness among market participants that contrasts sharply with bearish media sentiment.

As for TIF shares themselves, I’d prefer to wait either for a price in the mid-$50s or the 3Q12 earnings announcement rather than buy here/now.

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